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  #1  
Old 06-03-2010
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mesadmin3 mesadmin3 is offline
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Default Cavalry

1st tip - Cavalry:
When most people think of Cavalry in a war game they imagine mounted shock troops sweeping in at the last second to swipe victory from the jaws of defeat. While Cavalry did perform this role in the civil war, it was secondary to their main function, which was intelligence. Remember that in C63 you dont have satellite imagery or streaming real time data. What you do have are Cavalry, and with 10 movement points they are very mobile. Heck a cavalry unit moving down a turnpike (which costs only .33 movement points) can travel up to 33 hexes.
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  #2  
Old 01-14-2015
zobs1959 zobs1959 is offline
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Default ..so let me get this straight...

....we are engaged in two campaigns: one where I am Lee and you are mead and a mirror campaign where I am mead and you are lee.....
20 some days into campaign #one, in which I am Lee, you inexplicably surrender due to the fact that you believe one of my HQ's may invade Washington? I understand that I was well ahead in points and perhaps had you baffled, dazed and confused....but it was a most excellent game and the outcome by no means determined.....
and several days or more into campaign #two, where I am mead, you again inexplicably surrender due to a failed assault trying to get across the Potomac?
I understand how the carnage of war can turn the stout hearted into panic stricken commanders....
Irregardless, I thank you for the two major victories ( southern ones are hard to come by, and I often wish the leader board would reflect the quality of opponents faced and the side one chooses to command )!!
And I hope you find good use for my revealed southern strategy. I suspect you will employ it yourself against some unsuspecting newbie? (:
once bitten twice shy.
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  #3  
Old 01-16-2015
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Col John Moseby Col John Moseby is offline
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Posting daily stats when winning, whilst quitting early, whining and making excuses when losing. One needn't worry such conduct be mistaken for acts of chivalry or good sportsmanship.

Good games Zobs. Congratulations!
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  #4  
Old 09-09-2015
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so play me and give a real opinion, your the one who withdrew from the speed game?
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  #5  
Old 09-10-2015
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Col John Moseby Col John Moseby is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EVERS View Post
so play me and give a real opinion, your the one who withdrew from the speed game?
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Originally Posted by EVERS View Post
so I let u win one I feel sorry for you..... maybe you'll even our score in a couple more games.
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Originally Posted by EVERS View Post
do you want a medal, or the chest to pin it on?
My opinion seems sufficiently substantiated.
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  #6  
Old 09-10-2015
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what a bunch of grumpy old men you are
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  #7  
Old 09-11-2015
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its like romper room in the ghetto right mosby?
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  #8  
Old 09-11-2015
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so cal do u think you will win this?
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  #9  
Old 09-11-2015
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http://www.gutenberg.org/files/49920...ges/plate4.jpg
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  #10  
Old 09-11-2015
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FOUR



The capture of Quebec from the French by the English in 1759 is one of the epics of modern military history. Quebec was supposed to be absolutely impregnable, and was the stronghold of France in America. If the English had not been able to capture Quebec, Canada might have been French today. And this brilliant military feat was accomplished by a young major general only thirty-two years old. The leaders on both sides of the battle were killed; but the glory of their heroism has lived to this day.

After General Amherst had captured Louisburg in 1758 he took charge of the American campaigns of the Seven Years’ War between England and France. Under him was Major General James Wolfe, who was but thirty-one years old. Amherst ordered him to attack Quebec, while that general himself led a force to capture Montreal.

Wolfe’s command consisted of seven thousand men; while Montcalm, the French commanded of Quebec, had under him a considerably larger army. The British sailed up the St. Lawrence River and camped on the Isle of Orleans, facing the city.

There were three ways of attacking Quebec,—from the St. Lawrence River, from the St. Charles River, and up the steep cliffs to the Plains of Abraham. On the St. Lawrence side it was impossible to get near enough to the city to damage it, and to climb the steep rock to the Plains of Abraham seemed unworthy of consideration. So Wolfe decided to cross the St. Lawrence seven miles below Quebec, and to fight his way to the city by the St. Charles side. But this attack failed, with great loss to the English.

However, although he was discouraged, the stout heart of General Wolfe never failed. He began immediately to plan another way of getting into Quebec. He learned that the impossible could be accomplished, the heights to the Plains of Abraham could be scaled. From a little cove in the river, Wolfe’s Cove, a steep path led up the cliffs. It was a desperate chance; but it was worth taking.

He only had thirty-six hundred men that could be spared for the attempt, and on the evening of September 12, 1759, these embarked on the warships and sailed upstream. Montcalm was a wary warrior, and sent some troops to watch the movements of the English. The British troops landed some distance above Wolfe’s Cove; but at one o’clock in the morning Wolfe and half his force dropped downstream in boats and landed at the cove.

Then came the scramble up the cliff-side in the inky darkness. Slowly they worked their way to the top. At the summit the French had a weak redoubt guarded by a handful of men. This was the last place at which Montcalm had expected an attack. The garrison was easily driven from the redoubt, and by daylight the entire English force was upon the Plains of Abraham.

Montcalm drew up his men, and the two armies, French and English, stood face to face on the narrow battlefield. The French advanced and began to push the English back; but Wolfe rallied his men. He held back his fire until the French came within close range, and then at his order one volley decided the battle. With great gaps in their lines, the French halted, and Wolfe led on his men to complete the victory.

But the brave English general, wounded twice already, now received a shot through the breast that was fatal. Montcalm too was mortally wounded, and died the next day.

Quebec surrendered on September 18, 1759.

PREPARED BY THE EDITORIAL STAFF OF THE MENTOR ASSOCIATION
ILLUSTRATION FOR THE MENTOR, VOL. 1, No. 35, SERIAL No. 35
COPYRIGHT, 1913. BY THE MENTOR ASSOCIATION, INC.
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