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  #61  
Old 03-08-2019
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caledonia caledonia is offline
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Default battle at Berryville

June 27, evening
enemy advancing on Winchester in column along turnpike from Front Royal with cavalry scouting Winchester map.

Longstreet's Corp takes out enemy scouts and counter marches to take up defensive position along Winchester pike at Berrryville with detachment south of Winchester. Enemy encounters Longtreet and advance is halted still in marching column.

june 28, morning
Longstreets Corp attacks enemy lead brigades mercilessly from front and sides
driving his columns into confusion .
Casualties are alarming approx. 7300 enemy losses to Longstreet's 4500.

June 28, evening. Rain

Last edited by caledonia; 03-08-2019 at 02:41 PM. Reason: grammar
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  #62  
Old 03-13-2019
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Default wwnd

what would napoleon do?
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  #63  
Old 03-28-2019
Robert Banford Robert Banford is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caledonia View Post
June 27, evening
enemy advancing on Winchester in column along turnpike from Front Royal with cavalry scouting Winchester map.

Longstreet's Corp takes out enemy scouts and counter marches to take up defensive position along Winchester pike at Berrryville with detachment south of Winchester. Enemy encounters Longtreet and advance is halted still in marching column.

june 28, morning
Longstreets Corp attacks enemy lead brigades mercilessly from front and sides
driving his columns into confusion .
Casualties are alarming approx. 7300 enemy losses to Longstreet's 4500.

June 28, evening. Rain
Har har....I just saw this post. Is it from our current game? If so, that was Hancock getting ripped up because he did not heed the reports of my scouts being devastated just south of Berryville. It was like an old horror movie...."No, don't go in there!.....waaaaagh"

Last edited by Robert Banford; 03-28-2019 at 09:41 PM.
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  #64  
Old 2 Weeks Ago
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Lewiston-Auburn

2 Lewiston men hospitalized with gunshot wounds








CBS 13 | BDN



By Christopher Burns, BDN Staff • July 1, 2019 9:34 am




Lewiston police are searching for suspects after two men were hospitalized with gunshot wounds Saturday night.

Police responded to Birch Street about 9:17 p.m. after receiving a report of fighting and gunshots, Lewiston police Lt. David St. Pierre said Sunday evening. When officers arrived at the scene, they witnessed people fleeing and found spent shell casings, he said.




Not long after, a 26-year-old man, who police did not identify, arrived at Central Maine Medical Center with a single gunshot wound that wasn’t life-threatening. St. Pierre said that man was treated and later released.





Another man, who police did not identify but said was 18 years old, arrived at the hospital also suffering from a single gunshot wound. That man remains at the hospital, St. Pierre said.

St. Pierre said the shooting was not a random act, but no suspects have been identified. The investigation is ongoing.

Anyone who may have witnessed or has information concerning this incident can call Lewiston police Detective Tyler Michaud at 207-513-3001 ext. 3316 or the watch commander at 207-513-3001 ext. 3324.
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  #65  
Old 1 Week Ago
Theodoric Theodoric is offline
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Lewiston-Auburn >


Posted Yesterday at 10:27 AM

Updated July 5

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Lewiston man who was shot in the legs on Fourth of July is recovering

Lewiston police say they are still trying to determine where the shooting took place.




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LEWISTON — Police said a 28-year-old man was shot in both legs Thursday.


Lewiston police investigate the shooting of Christopher Williams, 28, who was found at 135˝ Bartlett St. late Thursday night with gunshot wounds to both legs. Larry Gilbert Jr./Sun Journal




Related Headlines
› Police investigate shots fired in Lewiston

Police responded at about 11 p.m. to 135˝ Bartlett St. to a report that a man had been shot. They found Christopher Williams, formerly of Rochester, New York, but don’t believe that is where the shooting occurred.

“Several officers and detectives worked into the late evening and overnight to try to determine the location where the incident occurred and seek potential witnesses,” according to a written statement by Lt. David St. Pierre. “At this time it is still unclear where the shooting actually took place.”

The two wounds to his legs didin’t appear to be life-threatening, St. Pierre said. Williams was taken to Central Maine Medical Center for treatment.

The investigation was ongoing.

Anyone who witnessed the incident or may have information about what happened is urged to call Detective Tyler Michaud at 207-513-3001, ext. 3316, or the watch commander’s office at ext. 3324.
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  #66  
Old 5 Days Ago
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NEW POEMS


BY

CHARLES G. D. ROBERTS




LONDON
CONSTABLE AND COMPANY LIMITED
1919




PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN.
CHISWICK PRESS : CHARLES WHITTINGHAM AND CO.
TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE, LONDON.




CONTENTS



TO SHAKESPEARE, IN 1916
"THE UNKNOWN CITY"
O EARTH, SUFFICING ALL OUR NEEDS
MONITION
ON THE ROAD
HILL TOP SONGS:
I. HERE ON THE HILL
II. WHEN THE LIGHTS COME OUT
IN THE VALLEY OF LUCHON
THE GOOD EARTH
WAYFARER OF EARTH
UNDER THE PILLARS OF THE SKY
ALL NIGHT THE LONE CICADA
EASTWARD BOUND
WHEN IN THE ROWAN TREE
WITH APRIL HERE
FROM THE HIGH WINDOW OF YOUR ROOM
THE HOUR OF MOST DESIRE
THE FLOWER
WHEN THE CLOUD COMES DOWN THE MOUNTAIN
THE STREAM
THE SUMMONS
THE PLACE OF HIS REST
GOING OVER
CAMBRAI AND MARNE





NEW POEMS


TO SHAKESPEARE, IN 1916


With what white wrath must turn thy bones,
What stern amazement flame thy dust,
To feel so near this England's heart
The outrage of the assassin's thrust!


How must thou burn to have endured
The acclaim of these whose fame unclean
Reeks from the "Lusitania's" slain,
Stinks from the orgies of Malines!


But surely, too, thou art consoled
(Who knew'st thy stalwart breed so well)
To see us rise from sloth, and go,
Plain and unbragging, through this hell.


And surely, too, thou art assured.
Hark how that grim and gathering beat
Draws upwards from the ends of earth,—
The tramp, tramp, of thy kinsmen's feet.
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UNDER THE PILLARS OF THE SKY

Under the pillars of the sky
I played at life, I knew not why.


The grave recurrence of the day
Was matter of my trivial play.


The solemn stars, the sacred night,
I took for toys of my delight,


Till now, with startled eyes, I see
The portents of Eternity.
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  #68  
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We mount the arc of ocean's round
To meet the splendours of the sun;
Then downward rush into the dark
When the blue, spacious day is done.


The slow, eternal drift of stars
Draws over us until the dawn.
Then the grey steep we mount once more,
And night is down the void withdrawn.


Space, and interminable hours,
And moons that rise, and sweep, and fall,—
On-swinging earth, and orbéd sea,—
And voyaging souls more vast than all!
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  #69  
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WHEN THE CLOUD COMES DOWN THE MOUNTAIN

When the cloud comes down the mountain,
And the rain is loud on the leaves,
And the slim flies gather for shelter
Under my cabin eaves,—


Then my heart goes out to earth,
With the swollen brook runs free,
Drinks life with the drenched brown roots,
And climbs with the sap in the tree.
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  #70  
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WINNING A CAUSE

WORLD WAR STORIES


BY

JOHN GILBERT THOMPSON


PRINCIPAL OF THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
FITCHBURG, MASS.


AND

INEZ BIGWOOD

INSTRUCTOR IN CHILDREN'S LITERATURE
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL
FITCHBURG, MASS.




AUTHORS OF
LEST WE FORGET




SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY
BOSTON —— NEW YORK —— CHICAGO




COPYRIGHT, 1919, BY
SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY.




PREFACE

Lest We Forget, the first volume of World War stories, gave an outline of the struggle up to the time of the signing of the armistice, November 11, 1918, and contained in general chronological order most of the stories that to children from ten to sixteen years of age would be of greatest interest, and give the clearest understanding of the titanic contest.

This; the second volume of the same series, contains the stories of the war of the character described, that were not included in Lest We Forget,—stories of the United States naval heroes, of the Americans landed in France, of the concluding events of the war, of the visit of President Wilson to Europe, and of the Peace Conference. In a word, emphasis is placed upon America's part in the struggle.

This volume should be of even greater interest to American children than the first, for it tells the story of America's greatest achievement, of a nation undertaking a tremendous and terrible task not for material gain, but for an ideal.

No more inspiring story has ever been told to the children of men than the story of America's part in winning the greatest cause for which men have ever contended. President Wilson said in Europe, "The American soldiers came not merely to win a war, but to win a cause." Every child in every home and in every school should be made familiar with how it was won, and with the separate stories which go to make up the glorious epic.

The two volumes of the series give for children, in a way that they will comprehend and enjoy, through stories so selected and so connected as to build up an understanding of the whole, the causes, the conduct, and the results of the World War.

The thanks of the authors and publishers are hereby expressed to Mr. Edwin Rowland Blashfield for the permission to reproduce his poster, "Carry On"; to Mrs. Ella Wheeler Wilcox for "Song of the Aviator"; to George H. Doran Company, Publishers, for "Pershing at the Tomb of Lafayette" from "The Silver Trumpet," by Amelia Josephine Burr, copyright 1918; for "Where Are You Going, Great-Heart?" from "The Vision Splendid" by John Oxenham, copyright 1918; for "Trees" from "Trees and Other Poems" by Joyce Kilmer, copyright 1914; to Collier's for Lieutenant McKeogh's story of "The Lost Battalion"; to Mr. Roger William Riis for his article "The Secret Service"; and to Mr. John Mackenzie, Chief Boatswain's Mate, U. S. S. Remlik, for the facts in the story, "Fighting a Depth Bomb."




CONTENTS



1. WHY THE UNITED STATES ENTERED THE WAR
2. AMERICA COMES IN Klaxton
3. PERSHING AT THE TOMB OF LAFAYETTE Amelia Josephine Burr
4. AMERICA ENTERS THE WAR David Lloyd George
5. THE FIRST TO FALL IN BATTLE
6. FOUR SOLDIERS
7. WHERE THE FOUR WINDS MEET Geoffrey Dalrymple Nash
8. THE SOLDIERS WHO GO TO SEA
9. WHEN THE TIDE TURNED Otto H. Kahn
10. A BOY OF PERUGIA
11. REDEEMED ITALY
12. SONG OF THE AVIATOR Ella Wheeler Wilcox
13. NATIONS BORN AND REBORN
14. "TO VILLINGEN—AND BACK"
15. ALSACE-LORRAINE
16. THE CALL TO ARMS IN OUR STREET W. M. Letts
17. THE KAISER'S CROWN Charles Mackay
18. THE QUALITY OF MERCY
19. THE REALLY INVINCIBLE ARMADA
20. "I KNEW YOU WOULD COME" Rev. Ernest M. Stires, D.D.
21. THE SEARCHLIGHTS Alfred Noyes
22. FIGHTING A DEPTH BOMB
23. THE SECOND LINE OF DEFENSE
24. U. S. DESTROYER OSMOND C. INGRAM
25. JOYCE KILMER
26. BLOCKING THE CHANNEL
27. THE FLEET THAT LOST ITS SOUL
28. THE LITTLE OLD ROAD Gertrude Vaughan
29. HARRY LAUDER SINGS Dr. George Adams
30. THE THIRTEENTH REGIMENT
31. WHERE ARE YOU GOING, GREAT-HEART? John Oxenham
32. THIS CAPTURE OF DUN
33. BOMBING METZ Raoul Lufbery
34. THE UNSPEAKABLE TURK
35. THE SECRET SERVICE Roger William Riis
36. AT THE FRONT G. B. Manwaring
37. A CAROL FROM FLANDERS Frederick Niven
38. THE MINER AND THE TIGER
39. THE LOST BATTALION
40. UNITED STATES DAY
41. NOVEMBER 11, 1918
42. IN MEMORIAM Alfred Tennyson
43. THE UNITED STATES AT WAR—IN FRANCE General John J. Pershing
44. THE UNITED STATES AT WAR—AT HOME
45. A CONGRESSIONAL MESSAGE Woodrow Wilson
46. PRESIDENT WILSON IN FRANCE
47. SERGEANT YORK OF TENNESSEE
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