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Old 06-30-2018
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Thumbs down Bull Run Fun

Sometimes I like how the game can evolve into a battle of Bull Run or present a Jubal Early scare on D.C.
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Old 06-30-2018
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Early’s Division


Commanded by Brigadier General Stephen Dodson Ramseur

Hoke’s Old Brigade Lt. Colonel William G. Lewis promoted to Brigadier General 6/2
1st North Carolina Sharpshooters
6th North Carolina Infantry
21st North Carolina Infantry
54th North Carolina Infantry
57th North Carolina Infantry
Johnston’s Brigade Colonel Thomas F. Toon promoted to Brigadier General 6/2
5th North Carolina Infantry Colonel Thomas M. Garrett
12th North Carolina Infantry Colonel Henery E. Coleman
20th North Carolina Infantry Colonel Thomas F. Toon (^)
23rd North Carolina Infantry
Pegram’s Brigade Lt. Colonel Robert D. Lilley promoted to Brigadier General 6/2
13th Virginia Infantry Colonel James B. Terrill
31st Virginia Infantry Colonel John S. Hoffman
49th Virginia Infantry Colonel J. Catlett Gibson
52nd Virginia Infantry
58th Virginia Infantry
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Old 06-30-2018
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Early's route to the Capital seemed open to his small army of now perhaps 12 - 15,000 men, as his three original divisions, led by Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon, Maj. Gen. Robert E. Rodes, and Brig. Gen. Stephen D. Ramseur, were joined by the addition of Breckinridge's Division; the remnants of the force defeated at Piedmont, now under Brig. Gen. John C. Vaughn; and a couple of mixed cavalry brigades under Bradley T. Johnson and John McCausland. All was not as it seemed however, since a scratch force of Federals was waiting for them south of Frederick, Maryland, under department commander Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace who had rushed them by rail from Baltimore in order to protect the B&O rail junction near the Monocacy River.
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Wallace's small force of some 3,000 was swelled by the addition of Union reenforcements sent by Grant from near Petersburg, the 3,000-man VI Corps division of Maj. Gen. James B. Ricketts. With roughly half the force disposed by Early, Wallace decided to offer battle at Monocacy. ( For additional information concerning the battle there, please see the following: http://civilwartalk.com/threads/the-...nocacy.103560/ ) Despite stiff resistance all through the afternoon of July 9, Wallace was finally forced to retreat back in the direction of Baltimore, once more leaving open to Early the way to Washington.
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As Early's small army approached the Federal capital, commanders there were thrown into momentary panic as they attempted to find enough troops to man the depleted forts and batteries which ringed the town making it possibly the most heavily fortified place on earth. As had become his custom, Abraham Lincoln was residing with his family in the so-called "Cottage" at the Soldiers' Home near Fort Totten on the northern defense line. ( http://civilwartalk.com/threads/linc...8/#post-942390 ) Responding to the threat, Lincoln returned to the White House, but was soon visiting nearby Fort Stevens, northernmost of the forts ringing Washington.
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Early deployed the leading division of Robert Rodes which had largely sat out the fight at Monocacy, but the approach march had been too strenuous and tiring in the July heat and dust and his division had been too greatly weakened by straggling to do more than skirmish with the Federal defenders. The following day brought further evidence that additional reenforcements from Maj. Gen. Horatio Wright's VI Corps of Grant's army had arrived. Now it was Early's turn to withdraw, having accomplished another of his objectives: the weakening of Grant's force facing Lee outside Richmond and Petersburg.
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