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Gameplay Manual

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Introduction

The Campaign of 1863 is an Online Team vs. Team Strategy Game that takes place at the height of the U.S. Civil War: the Summer of 1863.

The game runs for 38 turns (usually with a turn a day, however some players prefer our slower, once a week games) each of which consists of 2 phases: A planning phase and a combat phase. The planning phase is the core of The Campaign of 1863. Durring each planning phase you will receive intel reports on the units under your command, and you get to plan out orders for these units to follow. The combat phase begins once the turn deadline is up (usually midnight, Pacific Standard Time) durring which we download and process all players orders at the same time. Once we are finished processing the Combat phase we upload the results and you can start the next planning phase.

All you need to play The Campaign of 1863 is an internet connection, a standard web browser, and Flash player 8.0 or higher. *Please note that the current version does not support mobile devices (such as Android or iOS phones or tablets)

The Campaign of 1863 is designed around what we call asynchronous game-play which is just a fancy way of saying that your “team” or opponent do not need to log in at the same time to play the game. This lets you plan your orders at any time, up until the Combat phase deadline.

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Subscriptions

C63 is free to play 1 game at a time. However we also offer tiered subscription plans that remove advertising, allow you to play multiple games, allow access to Weekly schedule games, switches your account from an Enlisted rank to an Officer rank, and supports our development team to keep improving C63.

The current monthly subscription tiers are:
Free Plan - $0.0: 1 (one) Free Game Slot
Colonel Plan - $6.99: 2 (two) Game Slots and disables ads
Brigadier General Plan - $9.99: 4 (four) Game Slots and disables ads
Major General Plan - $14.99: 6 (six) Game Slots and disables ads
General of the Army Plan - $29.99: Unlimited Game Slots and disables ads

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Player Ranks

There are two Ranking tiers within C63. The non-paying player "Enlisted" Ranking system and the subscriber only "Officer" Ranking system. The top fifty players can be found on the Leaderboard. As you finish games of C63 you will be awarded points for wins and lose points for losses (see the following section on Points for more details). These points are used to give you your Rank on either the Enlisted or Officer ranking system. Points are accumulated separately from your rank. So an "Enlisted" player will continue to accumulate points above the 3000 point Sergeant Major threshold.

Officer Ranks:
GeneralGeneral GEN: 7000+ pts
Lieutenant GeneralLieutenant General LTG: 6000-6999 pts
Major GeneralMajor General MG: 5000-5999 pts
Brigadier GeneralBrigadier General BG: 4000-4999 pts
ColonelColonel Col: 3000-3999 pts
Lieutenant ColonelLieutenant Colonel LtC: 2000-2999 pts
MajorMajor Maj: 1000-1999 pts
CaptainCaptain Cpt: 500-999 pts
1st Lieutenant1st Lieutenant 1Lt: 100-499 pts
2nd Lieutenant2nd Lieutenant 2Lt: 0-99 pts

Enlisted Ranks:
Sergeant Majorsergeant major SGM: 3000+ pts
First Sergeantfirst sergeant 1SG: 2000-2999 pts
Staff Sergeantstaff sergeant SSG: 1000-1999 pts
Sergeantsergeant SGT: 500-999 pts
Corporalcorporal Cpl: 100-499 pts
Privateprivate Pvt: 0-99 pts

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Ranking Points

Ranking Points are earned or lost when you finish a game of C63. These points are used to give you your Rank on either the Enlisted or Officer ranking system. Points are accumulated separately from your rank. So an "Enlisted" player will continue to accumulate points above the 3000 point Sergeant Major threshold. Points are calculated at the end of the game using the following formula:

Victory Ratio (VR): CSA points / USA points


(VR) less than 0.9 : Major USA victory

(VR) less than 1.099 : Minor USA victory

(VR) less than 1.488 : Draw

(VR) greater than 1.489 : Major CSA victory


Points Awarded:


Major victory: +50

Minor victory: +25

Draw: +10

Major defeat: -10

Minor defeat: -5

Leader Bonus: +10


The Leader Bonus applies only to wins.

There is no Minor Victory for the CSA. Any CSA victory is considered a Major Victory.

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Game Types

There are currently four different Game Types for players to choose from:

  • Full: 5 vs 5 player game
  • Crew: 3 vs 3 player game
  • Team: 2 vs 2 player game
  • Duel: 1 vs 1 player game
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Game Turns

We also have 2 different turn schedules for players to choose from:

  • Daily: Orders due at 12:00 p.m. (midnight) Pacific Standard Time each day
  • Weekly: Orders due at 12:00 p.m. (midnight) Pacific Standard Time on a chosen day of the week (Subscribers Only)
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Sides

The 2 sides available for players to choose from are the United States of America (USA, “The Federals”) and the Confederate States of America (CSA, “The Rebels”). Each side consists of 5 Commanders

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Leaders, Commanders, Command Ratings and Initiative Ratings

In the Campaign of 1863 there are leaders and commanders.

Leaders

Leaders represent historical figures from The Campaign of 1863 and are selectable characters for the game. A leader generally does not take a direct role in combat unless their headquarters are involved. This is sometimes refered to as leading from the front. A leader who leads from the front increases the risk of being killed, captured or wounded. If your leader is lost a new leader will be promoted and assigned to the player. You should remember though that the newly promoted Leader will be inexperienced and will likely have less favorable command ratings.

Commanders

Commanders are the non-player subordinate officers who carry out the leader’s commands. Each division (Federal only), brigade and regiment in The Campaign of 1863 has a commander. As these commanders become casualties they are replace by the next senior commander in the appropriate chain of command.

Command Ratings

Command ratings in The Campaign of 1863 reflect the ability of leaders to implement their orders. They range on a numbered scale from 1-10, where 1 is least effective and 10 is most effective. For example, a leader with a low command rating may have a unit that won’t follow his orders. Units that fail to obey orders may simply not move at all or they may move in another direction. They may initiate combat on their own or they may refuse to fight.

Initative Ratings

Initative ratings in The Campaign of 1863 reflect the approximate historic agressiveness of a Leader. They range on a numbered scale from 1-10, where 1 is least agressive and 10 is most agressive. For example, a leader with a low initiative rating will most likely have a units that are slow to act.

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Commands

Stats for Leaders

In The Campaign of 1863 there are three levels of command available to players. There are two army commands, six corps commands and two cavalry commands available.

Army Command

There are two armies in The Campaign of 1863: The Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by General R.E. Lee and the Federal Army of the Potomac, commanded General Meade. The Army commanders are, in effect, the Confederate and Federal team leaders and control any units directly attached to their armies, as well as being able to issue orders to their subordinate corps and cavalry commanders.

Corps Commands

Corps Commanders are subordinate to their respective Army Commanders, and control all of the units directly attached to their respective corps. The generals with corps commands are:

USA: Reynolds, Hancock, and Sickles

CSA: Hill, Ewell, and Longstreet.

Cavalry Commands

There are two Cavalry Commands, one for each side and are approximately half the size of the corps commands. The two cavalry commanders are (CSA) Stuart and (USA) Pleasonton.

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Units

Units Legend

Units represent the troops under the command of a particular leader. They are represented on the game map using historically acurate symbols for each type and size of a unit. The following unit types appear in the game: Infantry, Artillery, Engineer, Headquarters.

Each type of unit will also have a size. These are (ranging from smallest to largest): Company (or Battery for Artillery), Battalion, Regiment, Brigade, Division, Corp, and Army.

USA units are blue, while CSA units are red.

There are 3 types that you will encounter in the game: Player, Friendly and Enemy. All units also have the following attributes: Fighting Strength, Maximum Strength, Morale Percent, Fit For Duty Percent, Weapon type, and a Commander; which are displayed both within the map and the staff report page. These attributes can and will be effected by things like weather, combat, and various orders.

Player Units

These will always be visible to you and you will have accurate intelligence on your own units. Your units will appear slightly lighter in color than friendly units, and will display a zone of control and a facing indicator.

Friendly Units

These will only be visible to you if you have one of your own player units on the same tactical map as the friendly unit. You will generally have reasonably good intelligence on friendly units. Friendly units will appear slightly darker in color and will not display a zone of control or facing indicator.

Enemy Units

These will only be visible to you if you have one of your own player units on the same tactical map as the enemy unit. You will generally have poor intelligence on enemy units, unless you have recently engaged them in combat. Enemy units will appear in the color of the opposing side.

Fighting Strength

Each unit has a Fighting Strength number. This represents approximately how many soliders within the unit are ready for action. Fighting Strength is determined by multiplying a units Maximum Strength by its Fit for Duty percent. A unit with a Maximum Strength of 1000 and a Fit for Duty percentage of 90% would have a Fighting Strength of 900, for example.

Maximum Strength

Each unit also has a Maximum Strength number. This represents the total number of soliders within the unit. Maximum Strength may only be reduced through combat and poor morale.

Morale

In The Campaign of 1863 all units have a morale value represented as a percentage. Morale may be decreased through movement, combat, weather and random events. Morale may be increased by using the Encamp order for at least one turn. A unit that is forced to march, retreated or routed will suffer a reduction in Morale. Any unit that ends the turn with morale below 20% is in danger of desertion.

Fit for Duty

The Fit for Duty percentage represents approximately what percentage of soliders within the unit are combat ready. Fit for Duty may be decreased by movement, combat, weather and random events. Fit for Duty can only be increased by using the encamp order for at least one turn. A unit that is forced to march, retreated or routed will suffer a reduction in Fit for Duty.

Weapons

Units will be equiped with one of the follwing weapon types:
Repeater: 140 Combat Value
Breechloader: 120 Combat Value
Carbine: 100 Combat Value
Rifle: 100 Combat Value
Musket: 80 Combat Value
Pistol: 60 Combat Value
Field Artillery
12 lb Napolean
3" rifle
4.5" rifle
10 lb Parrott
20 lb Parrott

Note that Artillery combat vaules are calculated using a different formula. In the current version of C63 Artillery combat values are treated as equal

Commander

The last unit attribute is the commanding officer. As these commanders become casualties they are replace by the next senior commander in the appropriate chain of command. Should your leader fall it is likely that the next senior commander will be promoted from within these ranks.

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Movement

In the planning phase of The Campaign of 1863 each unit has a movement allowance (also known as Movement Points or MPs). As you plan moves for a unit it expends movement points. These movement points are simple representations for how far a unit would be able to move within the next combat phase. So all this means is that Movement Points (MPs) are roughly equal to time.

Infantry units have three (3) movement points using a normal rate of movement, and maximum of six (6) movement points, should you choose to Force March your units. Mounted units have five (5) movement points using a normal rate of movement and a maximum ten (10) movement points, again if you choose to Force March the unit. Headquarters units are treated as mounted units. Artillery may never Force March. Roads and Turnpikes are found within the game maps and function as modifiers. A Road or Railroad will cost 1/2 of a MP and a Turnpike will cost 1/3 of a MP. See the Terrain chart below for more information.

Once you have selected a unit to move (see the Movement page for instructions) C63 will display the units Maximum Movement Points at the bottom of the Map page. As you plan out the hex-by-hex path you want the unit to take we deduct the cost of each hex and display your units Zone of Control, Facing, and place a movement arrow in its previous hex. A normal rate of movement is indicated with a green movement arrow. A Force March rate of movement is indicated with a red movement arrow. So to Force March a unit simply move a unit until it expends more than its normal MP allowance (5 for mounted units, or 3 for non-mounted)

Force March

Force Marching a unit means you want the unit to attempt to move at a faster pace, which would allow them to move farther than their normal movement pace would allow. The maximum rate you would be able to push a unit is double time, which would allow a unit to travel twice as far as a normal pace would allow. This means that a cavalry unit for instance may be able to travel up to 10 movement points at a double time pace however this does not come without a price. Force Marched units will lose Morale and Fit for Duty percentages quickly. Also note that the Force March penalty is cumulative for each hex you push the unit. So a Force March of 1 MP is much less damaging than a Force March of 5 MPs.

Concentration

Due to the enormous logistical strain it puts on a Commander and his staff, the maximum number of units that may occupy a hex is 4. Should a commander choose to “stack” 4 units in a hex they should remember this rule, as it will disallow any other units (player or friendly) from moving through the hex. And will result in “traffic jams” which in turn delay your units and will sometimes prevent them from reaching the hex you intend them to stop at.

Terrain

There are several different types of terrain and hex-side objects that have an impact in The Campaign of 1863. The following chart lists the movement point cost and combat effect of each element.


Infantry & H.Q.

Artillery & Cavalry

Other

Combat Modifier

Open Terrain Cost

1 MP

1 MP

1 MP

Normal

Broken Terrain Cost

2 MP

3 MP

Prohibited

+ 20% Defender Bonus (c)

City Terrain Cost

1 MP

1 MP

1 MP

+ 50% Defender Bonus (b)

Woods Terrain Cost

2 MP

3 MP

Prohibited

+10% Defender Bonus (c)

Town Terrain Cost

1 MP

1 MP

1 MP

+10% Defender Bonus (c)

Road/Rail Hexside Modifier

½ MP

½ MP

½ MP

NA

Turnpike Hexside Modifier

⅓ MP

⅓ MP

⅓ MP

NA

Ferry/Ford Hexside Modifier

+1 MP

+1 MP

+1 MP

-50% Attacker Penalty

River Hexside

(a)

(a)

(a)

(a)

Stream Hexside

+2 MP

+2 MP

(d) See below

-50% Attacker Penalty

Impassible Hexside

Prohibited

Prohibited

Prohibited

Prohibited


(a) Units may only cross major rivers at bridges and ferries. Major rivers block Zones of Control, and combat
(b) Units defending in city terrain will not retreat unless routed.
(c) Units defending in broken town or woods terrain are less likely to retreat.
(d) Streams become impassible with Rain

Terrain types and modifers
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Orders

Unit orders are comprised of 2 parts, Marching Orders and a Final Facing. Marching Orders must be issued in order to move your units. Keep in mind that the actual actions of a unit will not always correspond to the orders issued. You should remember that in war, “stuff” happens, and while orders may be issued, they may not be followed to the letter (or at all in some cases). Once a Unit has received their Marching Orders and a destination has been chosen, a Final Facing must selected. Please see the How To Move page for specific instructions on planing movement for an individual unit.

March Orders:

Attack

Any unit may be issued an attack order. A unit will attack any opposing unit that comes into its zone of control, however the unit will not make a suicide charge. If you wish to lead from the front, give your headquarters the attack order. If the final calculated combat odds are less than one to two the attack will default to a probe order. A unit may continue to attack as long as it is able to move and its morale remains average or higher.

Determined Attack

Units ordered Determined Attack will attack the first enemy occupied hex they encounter and may make only one attack during the turn, regardless of morale. The unit will not continue to voluntarily expend movement points. The final combat value of units with these orders is enhanced, the number of casualties suffered will be significantly increased.

Defense

Any unit issued a defend order will stop upon entering an enemy zone of control and move no further. The unit defends in the hex it occupies if it is attacked and may defend more than once per turn.

Resolute Defense

Any unit issued a resolute defense order will attempt to hold the hex it occupies at all costs. Units with these orders have enhanced final combat values and suffer increased casualties, but are otherwise identical to defense orders. Units may only defend resolutely once per turn.

Encamp

This is the default order for all units if no orders are issued for a particular unit*. An encamp order is used to reorganize troops and recover Morale and Fit for Duty percent lost through movement and combat. These units can not move or conduct any other voluntary action for the turn and will not recover Fit for Duty percent or Morale if forced into action within the turn (through an enemy attack, for instance). A unit that is attempting to Encamp and is attacked will default to a normal Defend order and suffer no penalty.
*This is different than missing a turn and not issuing orders. In that case units will wait half of the turn to receive their orders before encamping and therefore receive only half of the encamp bonus.

Hold and Entrench

The unit attempts to build an entrenchment. Hold and Entrench consumes a units movement points and requires at least 500 men of Fighting Strength. Remember that you are sending orders to the unit, and that the unit may not complete the entrenchment if they are interrupted durring the combat phase. No other fortifications may be built in this fashion.

Withdraw

Units with these orders will withdraw back along their planned line of movement, if possible, anytime an opposing unit enters its zone of control and can never voluntarily engage in combat.

Probe

Combat units with these orders attempt make company strength attacks on enemy forces. Successful probing attacks convey three possible benefits: probes can provide detailed intelligence information about the units contacted, probes can cause disruption of an enemy unit’s orders, and probing attacks irritate the enemy’s leaders. A Probe costs three movement points in order to carry out the mission. Probes are subject to all terrain and zone of control restrictions. No hex will be probed more than once in a turn. Probe combat is a type of skirmish and no combat odds calculation is required. Headquarters participating in probes have enhanced results at a very serious risk to the leader. Because of the small number involved, losses are generally light.

Screen

A unit issued the screen order will not engage in combat voluntarily. It functions similarly to a probe, in that it is gathering information about the any units encountered by its zone of control, but if it meets an enemy unit, it will either stop forward movement or retreat. It does not cost additional movement points, as probing does.

Reinforce

Support Order: Units issued a Reinforce order will reinforce and support units within a one hex radius of the units occupied hex. These units can not move or conduct any other voluntary action for the turn. Reinforcing units may perform this function as often as allowed under the normal rules of engagement. Upon choosing the Reinforce order a units Zone of Control is replaced with a surrounding green Zone of Reinforce indicator. Zone of Reinforce will not extend into Broken or Wooded terrian unless a Road or Turnpike extend the units visibility into the Broken or Wooded hex.

Barrage

Support Order - Artillery Only: Units issued a Barrage order will fire their guns at any Combat within a one hex radius of the unit. These units can not move or conduct any other voluntary action for the turn. Barraging units may perform this function as often as allowed under the normal rules of engagement. Upon choosing the Barrage order a units Zone of Control is replaced with a surrounding Zone of Barrage indicator. Zone of Barrage does extend into Broken or Wooded terrian and will cross Rivers and Streams. Should both sides of a Combat have Barraging units, the defending side Artillery will begin an automatic Counter-Barrage and attempt to damage the attacking Artillery.

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Final Facing and Zone of Control

Final Facing is the second element of a unit order and must be issued whenever a Marching Order is issued to a unit.

Final Facing

The other component of an order is the final facing, which is simply an instruction indicating the zone of control of a unit at the end of its planned movement. To issue a final facing a player presses the “s“ key after issing a Marching Order and or moving the unit, and then chooses the appropriate hex to “point” to using our W,E,A,D,Z,X movement system. Remember that the actual actions of a unit will not always correspond to the orders issued. A unit does not always end the turn facing as the controlling player intends.

Zone of Control

Units possess a zone of control consisting of three hexes. These hexes are usually in the direction of movement, however there are some orders that will change a zone of control. After a unit has stopped its planned movement, you select your final facing, which sets the zone of control for the turn.

Any friendly unit entering an enemy’s zone of control must stop and move no further during the current turn, unless permitted to do so by the nature of its orders. The effects of your zone of control is limited in certain cases. Terrains such as broken and woods impair the effectiveness of your zone of control. This is also true for streams, except along bridges, roads and railroads. Rivers, sea and prohibited hexsides always block zones of control regardless of the fords, bridges, roads or railroads.

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Combat

Combat may occur as units move. There are actions, skirmishes, engagements, assaults and battles. Furthermore units may sometimes voluntarily engage in combat more than once in a game turn. All combat results take effect immediately regardless of what point in the turn they may occur. Leaders may participate directly in combat by leading from the front, although this is risky.

The category of a particular combat is determined by the size of the defending force. Categories are used to impart information about the strength and intensity of a fight, and are available in your staff reports and when you reference a battle marker on your map.

Actions

An action is combat involving defending units of regimental. Actions do not generally consume movement points. After an action the participating units may continue to move as long as no opposing unit remains in their zone of control.

Skirmish

Combat involving defending units of brigade strength is considered a skirmish. Skirmishes may cost the participating units a single movement point. After a skirmish the participating units may continue to move as long as no opposing units remain in their zone of control.

Engagement

Combat involving between two and five defending brigades is considered an engagement. Engagements generally consume two movement points. After an engagement the participating units may continue to move if they have enough movement points remaining and if no opposing units remain in their zone of control.

Battle

Combat involving more than five defending brigades is considered a battle. Participation in a battle stops all voluntary movement.

Assault

These are any attack made against a fort. Participation in an assault stops all voluntary movement.

Combat Reports

Reports on each combat type are available from two locations. The first can be found within your Staff Reports. There is a Combat Report page that lists each combat that your units were engaged in within the previous turn. Within that list is a battle flag icon for each combat. Clicking on the icon will bring up a more detailed report*. The second location to view combat information is within the game Maps. Where ever a combat took place in the previous turn will also display a battle flag icon. These icons can also be clicked for the same detailed report*.

*Note that reported casualty numbers for losses suffered by your enemies are estimations given by your field commanders and will be reported on a sliding scale:

Minimal: 0 - 99

Light: 100 - 199

Moderate: 200 - 399

Heavy: 400 - 799

Severe: 800 and up

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Fortifications

There are three types of fortifications that appear in The Campaign of 1863: Entrenchments, Improved Entrenchments, and Forts. Of these only entrenchments may be built during the course of the game. Improved entrenchments and forts may never be built.

Entrenchment

These are simple field fortifications constructed rapidly by units and are the only fortifications that can be built during the game. Once it is built, all friendly units in the hex may benefit from a defense bonus as long as the triggering combat is in thr the same direction as the entrenchment. Building an entrenchment expends three movement points.

Improved Entrenchment

An improved entrenchment provides a better defensive bonus for all units in the hex. Improved entrenchments are permanent and may not be destroyed.

Fort

Forts are the largest of the fortifications and give you a double defense bonus. They are permanent structures and may not be destroyed. Units inside forts have no zone of control and have a surrounding defensive barrier.

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Weather

There are 3 types of weather within The Campaign of 1863. They are Fair, Hot and Rain

Fair

This is normal, most common, weather condition in The Campaign of 1863. There are no adverse effects upon either movement or combat.

Hot

Hot weather does not effect movement directly. Hot weather significantly effects your units attrition and effectiveness.

Rain

Heavy rains cause all streams and rivers on the map to be impassable except at bridges. Movement and combat are otherwise normal. Effectiveness declines and attrition increases.

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Victory Conditions

* Please note that during the Beta Testing period this section is subject to change *

Historically the Confederate objectives for The Campaign of 1863 were general, some might even say vague. For their part the Federals found themselves reacting to Confederate movements, rumored movements and hysteria, both governmental and popular. In the Campaign of 1863 assigning victory points to potential objectives simulates these factors.

Confederate Objectives

Primary - Destroy the political resolve of the Union by capturing and holding the following objectives:


Washington 10000 upon capture 1000 points per turn

Harrisburg 5000 upon capture 200 points per turn

Baltimore 3000 upon capture 200 points per turn

Alexandria 2000 upon capture 200 points per turn

Columbia 500 upon capture 50 points per turn

York 500 upon capture 50 points per turn


High Value Towns: 20 points per turn

Ashland

Riestertown

Elk Ridge Landing

Offuts Cross Roads

Rockville

Baileys Cross Roads

Annadale

Springfield Station


Low Value Towns: 10 points per turn

Dillsburg

Westminster

Freedom

Cookville


All remaining towns: 1 point per turn


Federal Casualties Inflicted 1 point for every 10 inflicted

Federal Objectives

Primary - Destroy the Army of Northern Virginia. General Lee's invasion provides the opprotunity to end the war by crippling their forces.


Confederate Casualties Inflicted 2.5 points for every 10 inflicted


Winchester 10 points per turn

Harpers Ferry 10 points per turn

Culpepper 10 points per turn

Victory Point Ratios (Who won the game?)

Victory is determined at the end of the final game turn (July 10th - evening, 38th turn) using the following formula:

Victory Ratio (VR): CSA points / USA points


(VR) less than 0.9 : Major USA victory

(VR) less than 1.099 : Minor USA victory

(VR) less than 1.488 : Draw

(VR) greater than 1.489 : Major CSA victory

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